20140301_Trade 151_0278.jpg

Press

 
 

PRESS

The world of ugly pink GIFs, Twitter profiles, aspirational feminine imagery and over-saturated colours and patterns are put together in a fantasy mash-up by Benigson's alter ego Princess Belsize Dollar in her performances, her online identity, her films and installations. Like a Pipilotti Rist for a harder, more media-savvy generation au fait with 'The Hills' and the Kardashians.

— the independent newspaper

 

"North London’s Essex road has long been synonymous with clusters of scantily clad, L-plate adorned and WKD’d up women in their 20s and 30s celebrating their last days of freedom. And now video and performance artist Helen Benigson has taken the hen party as the muse for her latest video work, now playing at the Tintype gallery’s latest show Essex Road II.”

— HUNGER magazine

 

"There's no doubt that Helen Benigson is an artist whose future looks very bright – in every sense. With a first-class BA and MA from Slade under her belt, she has been seen in galleries across the UK with work which could be called “multimedia” - but it's much more than that. Put rap, weightlifting, character-based performance, social media, and neon colours into the mix, and you're only just starting to get there.

— IMPERICA MAGAZINE

MULTI-TALENTED, multi-tasking, multi-cultural: today's creatives reflect Englishness in all its melting-pot glory. Helen Benigson uses performance art to channel her hyper-sexualised alter-ego Princess Belsize Dollar - a brash, LA-born rapper with a penchant for bikinis and replica guns.

— VOGUE magazine

 

"Art may not often deal with personal neuroses, but Helen Carmel Benigson confronts them head-on in her Technicolor one-room installation

— TIME OUT MAGAZINE

 

"An emerging artist to look out for, Benigson’s performances and colour saturated videos, objects and installations register the phenomena of the present.  This is the age of surfaces that, from plasma screen to mobile phone, blur the boundaries between our bodies of flesh and blood and the avatars and identities we imagine into being on-line. Technologies of screen and surface are departure points for works that appear as seamless dreams and fantasies, while they are self-conscious performances of identities, desires and states of being."

— FAD MAGAZINE